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Changing Tools (excerpt)
Why is it So Hard to Forgive?
What IS "Responsibility-Creep?"
The Old Man's Table

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Changing Tools (excerpt)

A tree saw - that’s the only instrument Dr Payne ever carried; the only one he ever needed.

To the folks of Nyevia, he was the island’s only brain surgeon. Sure, it was well known that his procedures usually produced more than their fair share of blood and gore. If patients were lucky enough to recover, their recovery would always be a long and difficult ordeal. Persistent infection and lifelong profound scarring were almost taken as a given but, for Dr Payne’s patients, he was their only hope and last resort.

Why is it So Hard to Forgive?

“To forgive is to set a prisoner freeand discover that the prisoner was you.”
Lewis B. Smedes

Jesus Christ tells a great parable about a certain king who wanted to reconcile accounts with his servants. A certain servant owing the king ten thousand talents was unable to pay his debt. Faced with the prospect of having himself, his wife and family sold into slavery, he begged the king for mercy, and mercy was granted to him. The story then goes on to tell of how that servant found another fellow servant who owed him a much smaller amount, but would not show the same mercy which had been shown to him; instead commanding that his creditor be thrown in prison until he pay every last denari of it.

What IS "Responsibility-Creep?"


“Responsibility Creep” refers to the gradual shifting of responsibility from one person or group of people to another, without notification, and sometimes without the consciousness of either party.
 


When my children were small, I could not count the number of times when they would run off to play, hand me their shoes or jumper and run away shouting, “Can you hold these?” Whilst most of the time I didn’t mind taking the clothes from them, it took me a lot longer to realise that, in doing so, they also expected me to take full responsibility for them from that point until the next time they needed them.

The Old Man's Table

Once upon a time, there was an old man who loved to collect antique furniture. For years, the old man had rented a split-level house, where the sunken lounge room was a two-inch step down from the dining room.
 
Every weekend, the man loved to go antique-shopping at one of the numerous old-wares stores in his village. On one such weekend, the man found a stunning antique table made of Tasmanian oak, with beautiful turned legs. The table was a large family table, and it was not until he had paid for it and had it delivered that he realized just how long it actually was.
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